G2Cdb::Human Disease report

Disease id
D00000024
Name
Rectal carcinoma
Nervous system disease
no

Genes (1)

Gene Name/Description Mutations Found Literature Mutations Type Genetic association?
G00002235 CTNNB1
catenin (cadherin-associated protein), beta 1, 88kDa
Y (11454429) No mutation found (N) N

References

  • Beta-catenin activation through mutation is rare in rectal cancer.

    Nilbert M and Rambech E

    Department of Oncology, University Hospital, 221 85 Lund, Sweden. mef.nilbert@onk.lu.se

    Increased transcriptional activation through beta-catenin stabilization plays a central role in colorectal tumorigenesis. Alterations of phosphorylation sites within the CTNNB1 gene, which codes for beta-catenin has been reported to occur in about one-half of colorectal tumors without APC-gene mutations. We assessed the importance of mutations in the regulatory domain, located within exon 3 of CTNNB1, in 103 rectal carcinomas and correlated these data with presence of microsatellite instability, somatic frame-shift alterations of the TCF-4 gene, and APC-gene mutations in the tumors. No mutation was detected in exon 3 of the CTNNB1 gene and our results thus demonstrate that beta-catenin activation through mutation rarely contributes to the development of sporadic and microsatellite instability stable rectal cancer.

    Cancer genetics and cytogenetics 2001;128;1;43-5

Literature (1)

Pubmed - human_disease

  • Beta-catenin activation through mutation is rare in rectal cancer.

    Nilbert M and Rambech E

    Department of Oncology, University Hospital, 221 85 Lund, Sweden. mef.nilbert@onk.lu.se

    Increased transcriptional activation through beta-catenin stabilization plays a central role in colorectal tumorigenesis. Alterations of phosphorylation sites within the CTNNB1 gene, which codes for beta-catenin has been reported to occur in about one-half of colorectal tumors without APC-gene mutations. We assessed the importance of mutations in the regulatory domain, located within exon 3 of CTNNB1, in 103 rectal carcinomas and correlated these data with presence of microsatellite instability, somatic frame-shift alterations of the TCF-4 gene, and APC-gene mutations in the tumors. No mutation was detected in exon 3 of the CTNNB1 gene and our results thus demonstrate that beta-catenin activation through mutation rarely contributes to the development of sporadic and microsatellite instability stable rectal cancer.

    Cancer genetics and cytogenetics 2001;128;1;43-5

© G2C 2014. The Genes to Cognition Programme received funding from The Wellcome Trust and the EU FP7 Framework Programmes:
EUROSPIN (FP7-HEALTH-241498), SynSys (FP7-HEALTH-242167) and GENCODYS (FP7-HEALTH-241995).

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