G2Cdb::Human Disease report

Disease id
D00000083
Name
Thyroid carcinoma in McCune-Albright syndrome
Nervous system disease
no

Genes (1)

Gene Name/Description Mutations Found Literature Mutations Type Genetic association?
G00001473 GNAS
GNAS complex locus
Y (12970318) Unknown (?) Y

References

  • Thyroid carcinoma in the McCune-Albright syndrome: contributory role of activating Gs alpha mutations.

    Collins MT, Sarlis NJ, Merino MJ, Monroe J, Crawford SE, Krakoff JA, Guthrie LC, Bonat S, Robey PG and Shenker A

    Craniofacial and Skeletal Diseases Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, Maryland 20892-4320, USA. mc247k@nih.gov

    McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS) is defined by the triad of café-au-lait skin pigmentation, polyostotic fibrous dysplasia, and hyperfunctioning endocrinopathies, such as precocious puberty, hyperthyroidism, GH excess, and Cushing's syndrome. This disorder is caused by sporadic, postzygotic activating mutations in the GNAS1 gene, which codes for the G(s)alpha protein in the cAMP signaling cascade. Nodular and diffuse goiters (with and without hyperthyroidism), as well as benign thyroid nodules, have been reported in association with MAS. Herein we report two cases of thyroid carcinoma in patients with MAS. The first is a case of papillary thyroid cancer detected incidentally during a hemithyroidectomy for hyperthyroidism in a 14-yr-old girl. The second is one of a 41-yr-old woman with long-standing MAS and an enlarging thyroid nodule, which was diagnosed as a clear cell thyroid carcinoma, a rare variant of thyroid cancer. Molecular analysis revealed that foci of malignancy and adjacent areas of hyperplasia and some areas of normal thyroid harbored activating mutations of Arg(201) in the GNAS1 gene. These findings suggest that the infrequent development of thyroid carcinoma in MAS patients involves additional mutational or epigenetic events.

    Funded by: NCI NIH HHS: CA-78436

    The Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism 2003;88;9;4413-7

Literature (1)

Pubmed - other

  • Thyroid carcinoma in the McCune-Albright syndrome: contributory role of activating Gs alpha mutations.

    Collins MT, Sarlis NJ, Merino MJ, Monroe J, Crawford SE, Krakoff JA, Guthrie LC, Bonat S, Robey PG and Shenker A

    Craniofacial and Skeletal Diseases Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, Maryland 20892-4320, USA. mc247k@nih.gov

    McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS) is defined by the triad of café-au-lait skin pigmentation, polyostotic fibrous dysplasia, and hyperfunctioning endocrinopathies, such as precocious puberty, hyperthyroidism, GH excess, and Cushing's syndrome. This disorder is caused by sporadic, postzygotic activating mutations in the GNAS1 gene, which codes for the G(s)alpha protein in the cAMP signaling cascade. Nodular and diffuse goiters (with and without hyperthyroidism), as well as benign thyroid nodules, have been reported in association with MAS. Herein we report two cases of thyroid carcinoma in patients with MAS. The first is a case of papillary thyroid cancer detected incidentally during a hemithyroidectomy for hyperthyroidism in a 14-yr-old girl. The second is one of a 41-yr-old woman with long-standing MAS and an enlarging thyroid nodule, which was diagnosed as a clear cell thyroid carcinoma, a rare variant of thyroid cancer. Molecular analysis revealed that foci of malignancy and adjacent areas of hyperplasia and some areas of normal thyroid harbored activating mutations of Arg(201) in the GNAS1 gene. These findings suggest that the infrequent development of thyroid carcinoma in MAS patients involves additional mutational or epigenetic events.

    Funded by: NCI NIH HHS: CA-78436

    The Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism 2003;88;9;4413-7

© G2C 2014. The Genes to Cognition Programme received funding from The Wellcome Trust and the EU FP7 Framework Programmes:
EUROSPIN (FP7-HEALTH-241498), SynSys (FP7-HEALTH-242167) and GENCODYS (FP7-HEALTH-241995).

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