G2Cdb::Human Disease report

Disease id
D00000198
Name
Epilepsy (autosomal dominant partial with auditory features)
Nervous system disease
yes

Genes (1)

Gene Name/Description Mutations Found Literature Mutations Type Genetic association?
G00001881 L1CAM
L1 cell adhesion molecule
Y (15079010) Microinsertion (MI) Y
G00001881 L1CAM
L1 cell adhesion molecule
Y (15079011) Microinsertion (MI) Y

References

  • LGI1 mutations in autosomal dominant partial epilepsy with auditory features.

    Ottman R, Winawer MR, Kalachikov S, Barker-Cummings C, Gilliam TC, Pedley TA and Hauser WA

    Gertrude H. Sergievsky Center, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA. ro6@columbia.edu

    Objective: S: Mutations in LGI1 cause autosomal dominant partial epilepsy with auditory features (ADPEAF), a form of familial temporal lobe epilepsy with auditory ictal manifestations. The authors aimed to determine what proportion of ADPEAF families carries a mutation, to estimate the penetrance of identified mutations, and to identify clinical features that distinguish families with and without mutations.

    Methods: The authors sequenced LGI1 in 10 newly described ADPEAF families and analyzed clinical features in these families and others with mutations reported previously.

    Results: Three of the families had missense mutations in LGI1 (C42R, I298T, and A110D). Penetrance was 54% in eight families with LGI1 mutations the authors have identified so far (five reported previously and three reported here). Excluding the original linkage family, the authors have found mutations in 50% (7/14) of tested families. Families with and without mutations had similar clinical features, but those with mutations contained significantly more subjects with auditory symptoms and significantly fewer with autonomic symptoms. In families with mutations, the most common auditory symptom type was simple, unformed sounds (e.g., buzzing and ringing). In two of the newly identified families with mutations, some subjects with mutations had idiopathic generalized epilepsies.

    Conclusions: LGI1 mutations are a common cause of autosomal dominant partial epilepsy with auditory features. Current data do not reveal a clinical feature that clearly predicts which families with autosomal dominant partial epilepsy with auditory features have a mutation. Some families with LGI1 mutations contain individuals with idiopathic generalized epilepsies. This could result from either an effect of LGI1 on risk for generalized epilepsy or an effect of co-occurring idiopathic generalized epilepsy-specific genes in these families.

    Funded by: NINDS NIH HHS: R01 NS020656, R01 NS036319, R01 NS036319-08, R01 NS043472, R01 NS043472-05, R01 NS36319

    Neurology 2004;62;7;1120-6

  • LGI1 mutations in temporal lobe epilepsies.

    Berkovic SF, Izzillo P, McMahon JM, Harkin LA, McIntosh AM, Phillips HA, Briellmann RS, Wallace RH, Mazarib A, Neufeld MY, Korczyn AD, Scheffer IE and Mulley JC

    Epilepsy Research Institute and Department of Medicine, University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. s.berkovic@unimelb.edu.au

    A number of familial temporal lobe epilepsies (TLE) have been recently recognized. Mutations in LGI1 (leucine-rich, glioma-inactivated 1 gene) have been found in a few families with the syndrome of autosomal dominant partial epilepsy with auditory features (ADPEAF). The authors aimed to determine the spectrum of TLE phenotypes with LGI1 mutations, to study the frequency of mutations in ADPEAF, and to examine the role of LGI1 paralogs in ADPEAF without LGI1 mutations.

    Methods: The authors performed a clinical and molecular analysis on 75 pedigrees comprising 54 with a variety of familial epilepsies associated with TLE and 21 sporadic TLE cases. All were studied for mutations in LGI1. ADPEAF families negative for LGI1 mutations were screened for mutations in LGI2, LGI3, and LGI4.

    Results: Four families had ADPEAF, 22 had mesial TLE, 11 had TLE with febrile seizures, two had TLE with developmental abnormalities, and 15 had various other TLE syndromes. LGI1 mutations were found in two of four ADPEAF families, but in none of the other 50 families nor in the 21 individuals with sporadic TLE. The mutations were novel missense mutations in exons 1 (c.124T-->G; C42G) and 8 (c.1418C-->T; S473L). No mutations in LGI2, LGI3, or LGI4 were found in the other two ADPEAF families.

    Conclusion: In TLE, mutations in LGI1 are specific for ADPEAF but do not occur in all families. ADPEAF is genetically heterogeneous, but mutations in LGI2, LGI3, or LGI4 did not account for families without LGI1 mutations.

    Neurology 2004;62;7;1115-9

Literature (2)

Pubmed - other

  • LGI1 mutations in autosomal dominant partial epilepsy with auditory features.

    Ottman R, Winawer MR, Kalachikov S, Barker-Cummings C, Gilliam TC, Pedley TA and Hauser WA

    Gertrude H. Sergievsky Center, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA. ro6@columbia.edu

    Objective: S: Mutations in LGI1 cause autosomal dominant partial epilepsy with auditory features (ADPEAF), a form of familial temporal lobe epilepsy with auditory ictal manifestations. The authors aimed to determine what proportion of ADPEAF families carries a mutation, to estimate the penetrance of identified mutations, and to identify clinical features that distinguish families with and without mutations.

    Methods: The authors sequenced LGI1 in 10 newly described ADPEAF families and analyzed clinical features in these families and others with mutations reported previously.

    Results: Three of the families had missense mutations in LGI1 (C42R, I298T, and A110D). Penetrance was 54% in eight families with LGI1 mutations the authors have identified so far (five reported previously and three reported here). Excluding the original linkage family, the authors have found mutations in 50% (7/14) of tested families. Families with and without mutations had similar clinical features, but those with mutations contained significantly more subjects with auditory symptoms and significantly fewer with autonomic symptoms. In families with mutations, the most common auditory symptom type was simple, unformed sounds (e.g., buzzing and ringing). In two of the newly identified families with mutations, some subjects with mutations had idiopathic generalized epilepsies.

    Conclusions: LGI1 mutations are a common cause of autosomal dominant partial epilepsy with auditory features. Current data do not reveal a clinical feature that clearly predicts which families with autosomal dominant partial epilepsy with auditory features have a mutation. Some families with LGI1 mutations contain individuals with idiopathic generalized epilepsies. This could result from either an effect of LGI1 on risk for generalized epilepsy or an effect of co-occurring idiopathic generalized epilepsy-specific genes in these families.

    Funded by: NINDS NIH HHS: R01 NS020656, R01 NS036319, R01 NS036319-08, R01 NS043472, R01 NS043472-05, R01 NS36319

    Neurology 2004;62;7;1120-6

  • LGI1 mutations in temporal lobe epilepsies.

    Berkovic SF, Izzillo P, McMahon JM, Harkin LA, McIntosh AM, Phillips HA, Briellmann RS, Wallace RH, Mazarib A, Neufeld MY, Korczyn AD, Scheffer IE and Mulley JC

    Epilepsy Research Institute and Department of Medicine, University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. s.berkovic@unimelb.edu.au

    A number of familial temporal lobe epilepsies (TLE) have been recently recognized. Mutations in LGI1 (leucine-rich, glioma-inactivated 1 gene) have been found in a few families with the syndrome of autosomal dominant partial epilepsy with auditory features (ADPEAF). The authors aimed to determine the spectrum of TLE phenotypes with LGI1 mutations, to study the frequency of mutations in ADPEAF, and to examine the role of LGI1 paralogs in ADPEAF without LGI1 mutations.

    Methods: The authors performed a clinical and molecular analysis on 75 pedigrees comprising 54 with a variety of familial epilepsies associated with TLE and 21 sporadic TLE cases. All were studied for mutations in LGI1. ADPEAF families negative for LGI1 mutations were screened for mutations in LGI2, LGI3, and LGI4.

    Results: Four families had ADPEAF, 22 had mesial TLE, 11 had TLE with febrile seizures, two had TLE with developmental abnormalities, and 15 had various other TLE syndromes. LGI1 mutations were found in two of four ADPEAF families, but in none of the other 50 families nor in the 21 individuals with sporadic TLE. The mutations were novel missense mutations in exons 1 (c.124T-->G; C42G) and 8 (c.1418C-->T; S473L). No mutations in LGI2, LGI3, or LGI4 were found in the other two ADPEAF families.

    Conclusion: In TLE, mutations in LGI1 are specific for ADPEAF but do not occur in all families. ADPEAF is genetically heterogeneous, but mutations in LGI2, LGI3, or LGI4 did not account for families without LGI1 mutations.

    Neurology 2004;62;7;1115-9

© G2C 2014. The Genes to Cognition Programme received funding from The Wellcome Trust and the EU FP7 Framework Programmes:
EUROSPIN (FP7-HEALTH-241498), SynSys (FP7-HEALTH-242167) and GENCODYS (FP7-HEALTH-241995).

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