G2Cdb::Human Disease report

Disease id
D00000212
Name
Spastic paraplegia type 2
Nervous system disease
yes

Genes (1)

Gene Name/Description Mutations Found Literature Mutations Type Genetic association?
G00001806 PLP1
proteolipid protein 1
Y (15450775) Microinsertion (MI) Y

References

  • A case of complicated spastic paraplegia 2 due to a point mutation in the proteolipid protein 1 gene.

    Lee ES, Moon HK, Park YH, Garbern J and Hobson GM

    Department of Pediatrics, Yeungnam University Hospital, Daegu, South Korea.

    Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD) is a rare X-linked dysmyelinating disorder resulting from mutation of the proteolipid protein gene (PLP1). Clinical features of PMD include progressive psychomotor developmental delay, nystagmus, spastic quadriplegia, dystonia, and cerebellar ataxia. PMD is clinically classified into three subtypes according to the severity of the disease: connatal, transitional, and classic forms. Patients with PMD have been identified with duplication, point mutations, and deletion of PLP1. In addition, spastic paraplegia 2 (SPG2) is allelic to PMD and typically caused by missense mutations in the second extracellular domain of PLP1 or in the PLP1-specific region that is spliced out during formation of the DM20 isoform. The authors describe a Korean boy diagnosed with SPG2 caused by a mutation that results in a Pro215Leu substitution in the second extracellular domain. Analysis of phenotypes resulting from mutations affecting PLP1 has been valuable in identifying functional domains of this still incompletely understood major myelin protein. Null mutations and mutations affecting the PLP1-specific domain cause peripheral neuropathy. The PLP1-specific domain also is important in the long-term maintenance of axonal integrity. This patient's phenotype was relatively mild, in contrast with other mutations at position 215 of PLP1 that cause severe PMD. One of these severe mutations is also a missense mutation substituting an aliphatic residue, alanine, for proline. The distinct severity difference between the Pro215Leu and Pro215Ala substitutions suggests that this region of the protein is very sensitive to subtle structural changes and likely plays a critical role in PLP1 function.

    Journal of the neurological sciences 2004;224;1-2;83-7

Literature (1)

Pubmed - other

  • A case of complicated spastic paraplegia 2 due to a point mutation in the proteolipid protein 1 gene.

    Lee ES, Moon HK, Park YH, Garbern J and Hobson GM

    Department of Pediatrics, Yeungnam University Hospital, Daegu, South Korea.

    Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD) is a rare X-linked dysmyelinating disorder resulting from mutation of the proteolipid protein gene (PLP1). Clinical features of PMD include progressive psychomotor developmental delay, nystagmus, spastic quadriplegia, dystonia, and cerebellar ataxia. PMD is clinically classified into three subtypes according to the severity of the disease: connatal, transitional, and classic forms. Patients with PMD have been identified with duplication, point mutations, and deletion of PLP1. In addition, spastic paraplegia 2 (SPG2) is allelic to PMD and typically caused by missense mutations in the second extracellular domain of PLP1 or in the PLP1-specific region that is spliced out during formation of the DM20 isoform. The authors describe a Korean boy diagnosed with SPG2 caused by a mutation that results in a Pro215Leu substitution in the second extracellular domain. Analysis of phenotypes resulting from mutations affecting PLP1 has been valuable in identifying functional domains of this still incompletely understood major myelin protein. Null mutations and mutations affecting the PLP1-specific domain cause peripheral neuropathy. The PLP1-specific domain also is important in the long-term maintenance of axonal integrity. This patient's phenotype was relatively mild, in contrast with other mutations at position 215 of PLP1 that cause severe PMD. One of these severe mutations is also a missense mutation substituting an aliphatic residue, alanine, for proline. The distinct severity difference between the Pro215Leu and Pro215Ala substitutions suggests that this region of the protein is very sensitive to subtle structural changes and likely plays a critical role in PLP1 function.

    Journal of the neurological sciences 2004;224;1-2;83-7

© G2C 2014. The Genes to Cognition Programme received funding from The Wellcome Trust and the EU FP7 Framework Programmes:
EUROSPIN (FP7-HEALTH-241498), SynSys (FP7-HEALTH-242167) and GENCODYS (FP7-HEALTH-241995).

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