G2Cdb::Human Disease report

Disease id
D00000046
Name
Uterine endometrioid carcinoma
Nervous system disease
no

Genes (2)

Gene Name/Description Mutations Found Literature Mutations Type Genetic association?
G00001624 PIK3CA
phosphoinositide-3-kinase, catalytic, alpha polypeptide
Y (17062663) Unknown (?) Y
G00002235 CTNNB1
catenin (cadherin-associated protein), beta 1, 88kDa
Y (11048799) Microinsertion (MI) Y
G00002235 CTNNB1
catenin (cadherin-associated protein), beta 1, 88kDa
Y (11048799) Deletion (D) Y

References

  • PIK3CA and PTEN mutations in uterine endometrioid carcinoma and complex atypical hyperplasia.

    Hayes MP, Wang H, Espinal-Witter R, Douglas W, Solomon GJ, Baker SJ and Ellenson LH

    Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, NY 10021, USA.

    Purpose: The tumor suppressor PTEN gene and the PIK3CA oncogene are frequently mutated in uterine endometrioid carcinoma (UEC). PTEN mutations are also common in complex atypical hyperplasia (CAH), the precursor lesion of UEC. The status of PIK3CA has not yet been explored in CAH. In this study, we evaluated both CAH and UEC for PTEN and PIK3CA mutations.

    Neoplastic tissue was microdissected, and DNA was extracted from 29 cases of CAH. DNA was available from 44 UEC cases previously characterized for PTEN mutations. Direct DNA sequencing of exons 9 and 20 of the PIK3CA gene was done on all 73 cases. In addition, CAH cases were analyzed for PTEN mutations. Statistical analyses were done using the Fisher's exact test.

    Results: Two (7%) of 29 CAH and 17 (39%) of 44 UEC cases contained a PIK3CA mutation (P = 0.003). Fourteen (48%) of 29 CAH cases had a PTEN mutation, but none contained both a PTEN and PIK3CA mutation. Twenty-five (57%) of 44 UEC cases had a PTEN mutation, and 12 (48%) of these 25 cases also contained a PIK3CA mutation. Coexistent PIK3CA and PTEN mutations were significantly correlated with UEC compared with CAH (P = 0.002), but the association in UEC did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.21).

    Conclusions: PIK3CA is the most commonly mutated oncogene in UEC; however, mutations are uncommon in CAH. Thus, mutations in PIK3CA, unlike PTEN mutations, are associated with invasion. These findings suggest that mutations in PIK3CA may serve as a marker of invasion with potential clinical use. Furthermore, PIK3CA and PTEN mutations may play distinct roles in endometrial tumorigenesis.

    Funded by: NCI NIH HHS: CA095427

    Clinical cancer research : an official journal of the American Association for Cancer Research 2006;12;20 Pt 1;5932-5

  • Mutational analysis of the CTNNB1 and APC genes in uterine endometrioid carcinoma.

    Schlosshauer PW, Pirog EC, Levine RL and Ellenson LH

    Department of Pathology, Joan and Sanford I. Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, USA.

    Despite recent studies, the molecular genetic events responsible for the development of uterine endometrioid carcinoma (UEC) remain incompletely characterized. Mutations in the beta-catenin (CTNNB1) gene have been recently reported in a small percentage of UECs and in the endometrioid variant of ovarian carcinoma suggesting that the Wnt signal transduction pathway is involved in the development of female genital tract tumors with endometrioid morphology. The Wnt pathway is a critical pathway in the development of colorectal cancer (CRC) with mutations occurring in the beta-catenin (CTNNB1) or adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) genes in 10 to 15% and 85% of cases, respectively. Because UEC and CRC share other molecular genetic alterations and histologic features and previous studies of UEC have not reported an analysis of the APC gene, we chose to further elucidate the role of the Wnt pathway in UEC. To this end, we analyzed 32 cases of UEC for mutations of the CTNNB1 and APC genes. Mutations of CTNNB1 were present in six of 32 (18%) cases: four grade 1 carcinomas, one grade 2, and one grade 3 carcinoma. Five missense mutations were identified, three involving Ser/Thr phosphorylation sites and two adjacent to a Ser phosphorylation site. One case contained a deletion encompassing codons 34 to 37, which includes a Ser phosphorylation site. No mutations resulting in truncation of the APC protein were found. Our results support a role for the Wnt signaling pathway via mutation of CTNNB1, but not APC, in the development of a subset of UECs.

    Modern pathology : an official journal of the United States and Canadian Academy of Pathology, Inc 2000;13;10;1066-71

Literature (2)

Pubmed - human_disease

  • Mutational analysis of the CTNNB1 and APC genes in uterine endometrioid carcinoma.

    Schlosshauer PW, Pirog EC, Levine RL and Ellenson LH

    Department of Pathology, Joan and Sanford I. Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, USA.

    Despite recent studies, the molecular genetic events responsible for the development of uterine endometrioid carcinoma (UEC) remain incompletely characterized. Mutations in the beta-catenin (CTNNB1) gene have been recently reported in a small percentage of UECs and in the endometrioid variant of ovarian carcinoma suggesting that the Wnt signal transduction pathway is involved in the development of female genital tract tumors with endometrioid morphology. The Wnt pathway is a critical pathway in the development of colorectal cancer (CRC) with mutations occurring in the beta-catenin (CTNNB1) or adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) genes in 10 to 15% and 85% of cases, respectively. Because UEC and CRC share other molecular genetic alterations and histologic features and previous studies of UEC have not reported an analysis of the APC gene, we chose to further elucidate the role of the Wnt pathway in UEC. To this end, we analyzed 32 cases of UEC for mutations of the CTNNB1 and APC genes. Mutations of CTNNB1 were present in six of 32 (18%) cases: four grade 1 carcinomas, one grade 2, and one grade 3 carcinoma. Five missense mutations were identified, three involving Ser/Thr phosphorylation sites and two adjacent to a Ser phosphorylation site. One case contained a deletion encompassing codons 34 to 37, which includes a Ser phosphorylation site. No mutations resulting in truncation of the APC protein were found. Our results support a role for the Wnt signaling pathway via mutation of CTNNB1, but not APC, in the development of a subset of UECs.

    Modern pathology : an official journal of the United States and Canadian Academy of Pathology, Inc 2000;13;10;1066-71

Pubmed - other

  • PIK3CA and PTEN mutations in uterine endometrioid carcinoma and complex atypical hyperplasia.

    Hayes MP, Wang H, Espinal-Witter R, Douglas W, Solomon GJ, Baker SJ and Ellenson LH

    Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, NY 10021, USA.

    Purpose: The tumor suppressor PTEN gene and the PIK3CA oncogene are frequently mutated in uterine endometrioid carcinoma (UEC). PTEN mutations are also common in complex atypical hyperplasia (CAH), the precursor lesion of UEC. The status of PIK3CA has not yet been explored in CAH. In this study, we evaluated both CAH and UEC for PTEN and PIK3CA mutations.

    Neoplastic tissue was microdissected, and DNA was extracted from 29 cases of CAH. DNA was available from 44 UEC cases previously characterized for PTEN mutations. Direct DNA sequencing of exons 9 and 20 of the PIK3CA gene was done on all 73 cases. In addition, CAH cases were analyzed for PTEN mutations. Statistical analyses were done using the Fisher's exact test.

    Results: Two (7%) of 29 CAH and 17 (39%) of 44 UEC cases contained a PIK3CA mutation (P = 0.003). Fourteen (48%) of 29 CAH cases had a PTEN mutation, but none contained both a PTEN and PIK3CA mutation. Twenty-five (57%) of 44 UEC cases had a PTEN mutation, and 12 (48%) of these 25 cases also contained a PIK3CA mutation. Coexistent PIK3CA and PTEN mutations were significantly correlated with UEC compared with CAH (P = 0.002), but the association in UEC did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.21).

    Conclusions: PIK3CA is the most commonly mutated oncogene in UEC; however, mutations are uncommon in CAH. Thus, mutations in PIK3CA, unlike PTEN mutations, are associated with invasion. These findings suggest that mutations in PIK3CA may serve as a marker of invasion with potential clinical use. Furthermore, PIK3CA and PTEN mutations may play distinct roles in endometrial tumorigenesis.

    Funded by: NCI NIH HHS: CA095427

    Clinical cancer research : an official journal of the American Association for Cancer Research 2006;12;20 Pt 1;5932-5

© G2C 2014. The Genes to Cognition Programme received funding from The Wellcome Trust and the EU FP7 Framework Programmes:
EUROSPIN (FP7-HEALTH-241498), SynSys (FP7-HEALTH-242167) and GENCODYS (FP7-HEALTH-241995).

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