G2Cdb::Human Disease report

Disease id
D00000312
Name
Watson syndrome
Nervous system disease
yes

Genes (1)

Gene Name/Description Mutations Found Literature Mutations Type Genetic association?
G00000036 NF1
neurofibromin 1
Y (8317503) Insertion (I) Y

References

  • Tandem duplication within a neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) gene exon in a family with features of Watson syndrome and Noonan syndrome.

    Tassabehji M, Strachan T, Sharland M, Colley A, Donnai D, Harris R and Thakker N

    University Department of Medical Genetics, St. Mary's Hospital, Manchester, United Kingdom.

    Type 1 neurofibromatosis (NF1), Watson syndrome (WS), and Noonan syndrome (NS) show some overlap in clinical manifestations. In addition, WS has been shown to be linked to markers flanking the NF1 locus and a deletion at the NF1 locus demonstrated in a WS patient. This suggests either that WS and NF1 are allelic or that phenotypes arise from mutations in very closely linked genes. Here we provide evidence for the former by demonstrating a mutation in the NF1 gene in a family with features of both WS and NS. The mutation is an almost perfect in-frame tandem duplication of 42 bases in exon 28 of the NF1 gene. Unlike the mutations previously described in classical NF1, which show a preponderance of null alleles, the mutation in this family would be expected to result in a mutant neurofibromin product.

    Funded by: Wellcome Trust

    American journal of human genetics 1993;53;1;90-5

Literature (1)

Pubmed - other

  • Tandem duplication within a neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) gene exon in a family with features of Watson syndrome and Noonan syndrome.

    Tassabehji M, Strachan T, Sharland M, Colley A, Donnai D, Harris R and Thakker N

    University Department of Medical Genetics, St. Mary's Hospital, Manchester, United Kingdom.

    Type 1 neurofibromatosis (NF1), Watson syndrome (WS), and Noonan syndrome (NS) show some overlap in clinical manifestations. In addition, WS has been shown to be linked to markers flanking the NF1 locus and a deletion at the NF1 locus demonstrated in a WS patient. This suggests either that WS and NF1 are allelic or that phenotypes arise from mutations in very closely linked genes. Here we provide evidence for the former by demonstrating a mutation in the NF1 gene in a family with features of both WS and NS. The mutation is an almost perfect in-frame tandem duplication of 42 bases in exon 28 of the NF1 gene. Unlike the mutations previously described in classical NF1, which show a preponderance of null alleles, the mutation in this family would be expected to result in a mutant neurofibromin product.

    Funded by: Wellcome Trust

    American journal of human genetics 1993;53;1;90-5

© G2C 2014. The Genes to Cognition Programme received funding from The Wellcome Trust and the EU FP7 Framework Programmes:
EUROSPIN (FP7-HEALTH-241498), SynSys (FP7-HEALTH-242167) and GENCODYS (FP7-HEALTH-241995).

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