G2Cdb::Human Disease report

Disease id
D00000316
Name
Immunoglobulin E-mediated allergic diseases
Nervous system disease
no

Genes (1)

Gene Name/Description Mutations Found Literature Mutations Type Genetic association?
G00000030 NOS1
nitric oxide synthase 1 (neuronal)
Y (15080837) Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) ?

References

  • Neuronal nitric oxide synthase gene polymorphism and IgE-mediated allergy in the Central European population.

    Hollá LI, Schüller M, Bucková D and Vácha J

    Department of Pathological Physiology, Masaryk University Brno, Brno, Czech Republic.

    Background: Several findings suggest that nitric oxide (NO) plays a significant role in the regulation of the Th1/Th2 balance and contributes to the development of allergic diseases. Our study investigates a possible association of C/T transition located 276-bp downstream from the translation termination site in exon 29 of the human nitric oxide synthase type 1 (NOS1) gene with immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated allergic diseases in the Czech population.

    Methods: The study included 688 subjects - 368 patients with clinically manifested allergic diseases and 320 unrelated controls with negative familial history of asthma/atopy. The NOS1 genotypes were determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and restriction analysis by Eco72I.

    Results: No significant differences were found for allele or genotype frequencies of the 5266 C/T polymorphism in exon 29 of the NOS1 gene between IgE-mediated allergic diseases (or asthma alone) and healthy subjects. However, this common polymorphism showed a significant association with signs of atopy, especially with total serum IgE levels [log(e) IgE levels (mean +/- SD): CC genotype = 4.34 +/- 1.40; CT genotype = 4.58 +/- 1.53; TT genotype = 5.01 +/- 1.61; P < 0.05).

    Conclusions: Our findings suggest that NOS1 gene may participate in the pathogenesis of high total serum IgE levels in allergic diseases in our population. These findings provide support for NOS1 as a candidate gene for IgE-mediated allergy.

    Allergy 2004;59;5;548-52

Literature (1)

Pubmed - other

  • Neuronal nitric oxide synthase gene polymorphism and IgE-mediated allergy in the Central European population.

    Hollá LI, Schüller M, Bucková D and Vácha J

    Department of Pathological Physiology, Masaryk University Brno, Brno, Czech Republic.

    Background: Several findings suggest that nitric oxide (NO) plays a significant role in the regulation of the Th1/Th2 balance and contributes to the development of allergic diseases. Our study investigates a possible association of C/T transition located 276-bp downstream from the translation termination site in exon 29 of the human nitric oxide synthase type 1 (NOS1) gene with immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated allergic diseases in the Czech population.

    Methods: The study included 688 subjects - 368 patients with clinically manifested allergic diseases and 320 unrelated controls with negative familial history of asthma/atopy. The NOS1 genotypes were determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and restriction analysis by Eco72I.

    Results: No significant differences were found for allele or genotype frequencies of the 5266 C/T polymorphism in exon 29 of the NOS1 gene between IgE-mediated allergic diseases (or asthma alone) and healthy subjects. However, this common polymorphism showed a significant association with signs of atopy, especially with total serum IgE levels [log(e) IgE levels (mean +/- SD): CC genotype = 4.34 +/- 1.40; CT genotype = 4.58 +/- 1.53; TT genotype = 5.01 +/- 1.61; P < 0.05).

    Conclusions: Our findings suggest that NOS1 gene may participate in the pathogenesis of high total serum IgE levels in allergic diseases in our population. These findings provide support for NOS1 as a candidate gene for IgE-mediated allergy.

    Allergy 2004;59;5;548-52

© G2C 2014. The Genes to Cognition Programme received funding from The Wellcome Trust and the EU FP7 Framework Programmes:
EUROSPIN (FP7-HEALTH-241498), SynSys (FP7-HEALTH-242167) and GENCODYS (FP7-HEALTH-241995).

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