G2Cdb::Human Disease report

Disease id
D00000321
Name
Cancer
Nervous system disease
no

Genes (3)

Gene Name/Description Mutations Found Literature Mutations Type Genetic association?
G00001624 PIK3CA
phosphoinositide-3-kinase, catalytic, alpha polypeptide
Y (15016963) Unknown (?) Y
G00002235 CTNNB1
catenin (cadherin-associated protein), beta 1, 88kDa
Y (17258725) No mutation found (N) N
G00000031 HRAS
v-Ha-ras Harvey rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog
Y (17088437) Microinsertion (MI) Y

References

  • Homozygous PMS2 deletion causes a severe colorectal cancer and multiple adenoma phenotype without extraintestinal cancer.

    Will O, Carvajal-Carmona LG, Gorman P, Howarth KM, Jones AM, Polanco-Echeverry GM, Chinaleong JA, Günther T, Silver A, Clark SK and Tomlinson I

    Molecular and Population Genetics Laboratory, London Research Institute, Cancer Research, London, UK.

    We report a patient of Indian descent with parental consanguinity, who developed 10 carcinomas and 35 adenomatous polyps at age 23 and duodenal adenocarcinoma at age 25. He also had dysmorphic features, mental retardation, and café-au-lait spots but no brain tumor. We aimed to establish his molecular diagnosis.

    Methods: Germ-line screening for APC and MYH/MUTYH mutations was normal as was immunohistochemistry for MLH1 and MSH2 proteins. Investigation by array-comparative genomic hybridization revealed deletion of a small region on chromosome 7. Using polymerase chain reaction, this region was refined to a 400-kilobase deletion, which included exons 9-15 of the PMS2 gene, and all coding regions of oncomodulin, TRIAD3, and FSCN1.

    Results: The deletion was confirmed as homozygous, and both parents were carriers. Immunohistochemistry showed absent PMS2 expression in all tumors and normal tissue. Most tumors showed microsatellite instability, more marked at dinucleotide than mononucleotide repeats. The tumors harbored no somatic mutations in APC, BRAF, AXIN2, or beta-catenin, but KRAS2 and TGFBR2 mutations were found.

    Conclusions: Our patient represents a novel phenotype for homozygous PMS2 mutation and perhaps the most severe colorectal cancer phenotype-in terms of numbers of malignancies at an early age-described to date. PMS2 mutations-and perhaps other homozygous mismatch repair mutations-should be considered in any patient presenting with multiple gastrointestinal tumors, since our patient could not be distinguished clinically from cases with attenuated familial adenomatous polyposis or MUTYH-associated polyposis.

    Gastroenterology 2007;132;2;527-30

  • Mutation analysis of 24 known cancer genes in the NCI-60 cell line set.

    Ikediobi ON, Davies H, Bignell G, Edkins S, Stevens C, O'Meara S, Santarius T, Avis T, Barthorpe S, Brackenbury L, Buck G, Butler A, Clements J, Cole J, Dicks E, Forbes S, Gray K, Halliday K, Harrison R, Hills K, Hinton J, Hunter C, Jenkinson A, Jones D, Kosmidou V, Lugg R, Menzies A, Mironenko T, Parker A, Perry J, Raine K, Richardson D, Shepherd R, Small A, Smith R, Solomon H, Stephens P, Teague J, Tofts C, Varian J, Webb T, West S, Widaa S, Yates A, Reinhold W, Weinstein JN, Stratton MR, Futreal PA and Wooster R

    Cancer Genome Project, Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Hinxton, Cambridge CB10 1SA, United Kingdom. mrs@sanger.ac.uk.

    The panel of 60 human cancer cell lines (the NCI-60) assembled by the National Cancer Institute for anticancer drug discovery is a widely used resource. The NCI-60 has been characterized pharmacologically and at the molecular level more extensively than any other set of cell lines. However, no systematic mutation analysis of genes causally implicated in oncogenesis has been reported. This study reports the sequence analysis of 24 known cancer genes in the NCI-60 and an assessment of 4 of the 24 genes for homozygous deletions. One hundred thirty-seven oncogenic mutations were identified in 14 (APC, BRAF, CDKN2, CTNNB1, HRAS, KRAS, NRAS, SMAD4, PIK3CA, PTEN, RB1, STK11, TP53, and VHL) of the 24 genes. All lines have at least one mutation among the cancer genes examined, with most lines (73%) having more than one. Identification of those cancer genes mutated in the NCI-60, in combination with pharmacologic and molecular profiles of the cells, will allow for more informed interpretation of anticancer agent screening and will enhance the use of the NCI-60 cell lines for molecularly targeted screens.

    Funded by: Intramural NIH HHS; Wellcome Trust: 077012

    Molecular cancer therapeutics 2006;5;11;2606-12

  • High frequency of mutations of the PIK3CA gene in human cancers.

    Samuels Y, Wang Z, Bardelli A, Silliman N, Ptak J, Szabo S, Yan H, Gazdar A, Powell SM, Riggins GJ, Willson JK, Markowitz S, Kinzler KW, Vogelstein B and Velculescu VE

    Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, The Johns Hopkins University Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD 21231, USA.

    Funded by: NCI NIH HHS: CA 43460, CA 57345, CA 62924, CA 67900, CA 88128

    Science (New York, N.Y.) 2004;304;5670;554

Literature (3)

Pubmed - human_disease

  • Homozygous PMS2 deletion causes a severe colorectal cancer and multiple adenoma phenotype without extraintestinal cancer.

    Will O, Carvajal-Carmona LG, Gorman P, Howarth KM, Jones AM, Polanco-Echeverry GM, Chinaleong JA, Günther T, Silver A, Clark SK and Tomlinson I

    Molecular and Population Genetics Laboratory, London Research Institute, Cancer Research, London, UK.

    We report a patient of Indian descent with parental consanguinity, who developed 10 carcinomas and 35 adenomatous polyps at age 23 and duodenal adenocarcinoma at age 25. He also had dysmorphic features, mental retardation, and café-au-lait spots but no brain tumor. We aimed to establish his molecular diagnosis.

    Methods: Germ-line screening for APC and MYH/MUTYH mutations was normal as was immunohistochemistry for MLH1 and MSH2 proteins. Investigation by array-comparative genomic hybridization revealed deletion of a small region on chromosome 7. Using polymerase chain reaction, this region was refined to a 400-kilobase deletion, which included exons 9-15 of the PMS2 gene, and all coding regions of oncomodulin, TRIAD3, and FSCN1.

    Results: The deletion was confirmed as homozygous, and both parents were carriers. Immunohistochemistry showed absent PMS2 expression in all tumors and normal tissue. Most tumors showed microsatellite instability, more marked at dinucleotide than mononucleotide repeats. The tumors harbored no somatic mutations in APC, BRAF, AXIN2, or beta-catenin, but KRAS2 and TGFBR2 mutations were found.

    Conclusions: Our patient represents a novel phenotype for homozygous PMS2 mutation and perhaps the most severe colorectal cancer phenotype-in terms of numbers of malignancies at an early age-described to date. PMS2 mutations-and perhaps other homozygous mismatch repair mutations-should be considered in any patient presenting with multiple gastrointestinal tumors, since our patient could not be distinguished clinically from cases with attenuated familial adenomatous polyposis or MUTYH-associated polyposis.

    Gastroenterology 2007;132;2;527-30

  • Mutation analysis of 24 known cancer genes in the NCI-60 cell line set.

    Ikediobi ON, Davies H, Bignell G, Edkins S, Stevens C, O'Meara S, Santarius T, Avis T, Barthorpe S, Brackenbury L, Buck G, Butler A, Clements J, Cole J, Dicks E, Forbes S, Gray K, Halliday K, Harrison R, Hills K, Hinton J, Hunter C, Jenkinson A, Jones D, Kosmidou V, Lugg R, Menzies A, Mironenko T, Parker A, Perry J, Raine K, Richardson D, Shepherd R, Small A, Smith R, Solomon H, Stephens P, Teague J, Tofts C, Varian J, Webb T, West S, Widaa S, Yates A, Reinhold W, Weinstein JN, Stratton MR, Futreal PA and Wooster R

    Cancer Genome Project, Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Hinxton, Cambridge CB10 1SA, United Kingdom. mrs@sanger.ac.uk.

    The panel of 60 human cancer cell lines (the NCI-60) assembled by the National Cancer Institute for anticancer drug discovery is a widely used resource. The NCI-60 has been characterized pharmacologically and at the molecular level more extensively than any other set of cell lines. However, no systematic mutation analysis of genes causally implicated in oncogenesis has been reported. This study reports the sequence analysis of 24 known cancer genes in the NCI-60 and an assessment of 4 of the 24 genes for homozygous deletions. One hundred thirty-seven oncogenic mutations were identified in 14 (APC, BRAF, CDKN2, CTNNB1, HRAS, KRAS, NRAS, SMAD4, PIK3CA, PTEN, RB1, STK11, TP53, and VHL) of the 24 genes. All lines have at least one mutation among the cancer genes examined, with most lines (73%) having more than one. Identification of those cancer genes mutated in the NCI-60, in combination with pharmacologic and molecular profiles of the cells, will allow for more informed interpretation of anticancer agent screening and will enhance the use of the NCI-60 cell lines for molecularly targeted screens.

    Funded by: Intramural NIH HHS; Wellcome Trust: 077012

    Molecular cancer therapeutics 2006;5;11;2606-12

Pubmed - other

  • High frequency of mutations of the PIK3CA gene in human cancers.

    Samuels Y, Wang Z, Bardelli A, Silliman N, Ptak J, Szabo S, Yan H, Gazdar A, Powell SM, Riggins GJ, Willson JK, Markowitz S, Kinzler KW, Vogelstein B and Velculescu VE

    Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, The Johns Hopkins University Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD 21231, USA.

    Funded by: NCI NIH HHS: CA 43460, CA 57345, CA 62924, CA 67900, CA 88128

    Science (New York, N.Y.) 2004;304;5670;554

© G2C 2014. The Genes to Cognition Programme received funding from The Wellcome Trust and the EU FP7 Framework Programmes:
EUROSPIN (FP7-HEALTH-241498), SynSys (FP7-HEALTH-242167) and GENCODYS (FP7-HEALTH-241995).

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